The Civil Wars

The Civil Wars Review

Appian's Civil Wars offers a masterly account of the turbulent epoch from the time of Tiberius Gracchus (133 BC) to the tremendous conflicts which followed the murder of Julius Caesar. For the events between 133 and 70 BC he is the only surviving continuous narrative source. The subsequent books vividly describe Catiline's conspiracy, the rise and fall of the First Triumvirate, and Caesar's crossing of the Rubicon, defeat of Pompey and untimely death. The climax comes with the birth of the Second Triumvirate out of anarchy, the terrible purges of Proscriptions which followed, and the titanic struggle for world mastery which was only to end with Augustus's defeat of Antony and Cleopatra. If Appian's Roman History as a whole reveals how an empire was born of the struggle against a series of external enemies, these five books concentrate on an even greater ordeal. Despite the rhetorical flourishes, John Carter suggests in his Introduction, the impressive 'overall conception of the decline of the Roman state into violence, with its sombre highlights and the leitmotif of fate, is neither trivial nor inaccurate'.

Title:The Civil Wars
Edition Language:English

Enjoy the book review !

    The Civil Wars Reviews

  • Brian

    Leave all your presupposes at the table of contents; Appian and his Civil Wars isn’t going to bore you with a dry tale - he’s going to knock your socks off. Fans of Game of Thrones, House of Cards...

  • Yann

    tome 1:Les Guerres civiles à Rome, tome 1tome 2:Les Guerres Civiles à Rome, tome 2tome 3:Les Guerres civiles à Rome, tome 3tome 4:Les guerres civiles à Rome : Tome 4...

  • max

    The collapse of the Roman republic is one of the most absorbing events in all of world history. Lately I have been somewhat fixated with it; this summer I finally have the long awaited leisure to purs...

  • Josh

    A solid piece of writing formed from 5 books: Sulla, Caesar, War of Mutina, War against Brutus and Cassius and the war against Sextus Pompeius. These books originally formed part of Appian's 24 book h...

  • Roelof Schipper

    Drie sterren voor Appianus van Alexandrië, de man wiens doorkliefde hoofd toch niet de voorkant van deze editie siert; het is Iulius Caesar, de man die sterven moest aan drieëntwintig dolksteken. Ie...

  • Jenn Phizacklea

    This is a really fascinating read, tracing the civil strife from Sulla and Marius to the execution of Sextus Pompeius (arguably not the end of the civil wars really, which should probably roll on unti...

  • Daniel

    This book is hard reading if for no other reason than its a depressing tale of butchery and murder that culminates in an absolute dictatorship. For me as a modern person, the best part of the book is ...

  • Matt Shoen

    John Carter's translation of Appian's The Civil War is an extremely good translation of a key text of the Roman Civil War. Appian's work is less known than that of authors like Caesar or Sallust howe...

  • Andrew

    This is easily one of the best historical narratives I've ever read concerning the period of civil war resulting in Rome's transition from democracy to autocracy and finally monarchy. Beginning with M...

  • Bruce

    This morning I completed Appian’s The Civil Wars, a work I enjoyed very much and found easy to read, this volume containing five books from his much larger Roman History, these particular five books...